Has Questioning 9/11 become more Acceptable? By Nile Bowie

Has Questioning 9/11 become more Acceptable?

By Nile Bowie
September 11, 2013

Despite the media’s best efforts to dismiss 9/11 conspiracy theories, one in two Americans doubt the government’s narrative and skepticism is slowly seeping its way into the mainstream.

Twelve years on from the events of September 11th 2001 and a seemingly nightmarish deja vu has gripped the United States and its war-weary citizens. Again, the pubic is told that destructive weapons in far away countries pose a critical danger, and that despite wearing the clothes of humanitarianism, a military solution that will inevitably harm civilians is the only meaningful response. The main difference today is that after an abstract decade-long “War on Terror,” Washington finds itself fighting in Syria on the same side as al-Qaeda and those who are sympathetic to the alleged culprits of the 9/11 attacks.

The international relations landscape has changed dramatically over the past twelve years, and in the build-up to another US military intervention in West Asia, a handful of leaders are today more willing to ask common sense questions about the official line toed by Washington, such as: How can the Obama administration assert that Assad used chemical weapons before the UN team of experts on the ground have even published their findings?

World leaders have cast doubt on Washington’s stories before, but that the leaders of major countries have – ever so gently – insinuated that Washington may be complicit in a ‘false flag operation’ to justify military escalation in Syria is quite significant. As the diplomatic spectacle around Syria unfolds and the anniversary of 9/11 looms, these times beg the question, “What else could they be lying about?

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